River Gods and Culture Wars

Love or Lust? William Byrd II and Lucy

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

William Byrd II married Lucy Parke when she was nineteen years old. Their short life together has made many believe that they did not love each other, and that William enjoyed only sleeping with her. However, there are clues pointing to both  the couple’s constant fighting and that they truly loved each other.  The two had insecurities. […]

The Gentry of the Eighteenth Century

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

The gentry of eighteenth century changed the New World in many different aspects by the time of the colony matured.  They built churches, plantations, endorsed the latest London fashions, and enforced the law. All of these helped change the physical and cultural landscape of Virginia in the late 17th and 18th centuries. In order to […]

Role of Women: Hardships of a Gentry Lifestyle

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Kelby Williamson Jamestown through the Revolution: Week Two In early eighteenth century Virginia there was a very clear and distinct “elite class” that controlled much of the colony’s political and social life. This class was known as the gentry. The gentry consisted of families that had great wealth and in this period it was acceptable […]

Darling Degenerates to Democratic Dynamos

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Today we hold our founding fathers on a pedestal, viewing them as some of the greatest people to grace the face of this planet.  Actually, we don’t just hold them up on a pedestal- we hold them in much higher regard than that, going so far as to carve their faces into the side of […]

Religion: A double-edged Sword

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Slave masters generally concurred that converting heathens and preaching servitude to slaves would subdue any rebellious tendencies, but why if conversion seemed so agreeable did slave owners fail to Christianize their slaves? Why did some churches have galleries for slaves while others like Christ Church did not? The variability of slaves’ church attendance contradicts the […]

Spatial Control of the Virginia Gentry

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

In the colonial period, the gentry class was comprised of those in Virginia who had acquired both the greatest wealth and the greatest prominence in society. In order to preserve and ensure their position in society and their way of life, the gentry imposed a social hierarchy on Virginia society, which allowed them to continue […]

Glorified Gardens (Post 2)

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Chloe Kiernicki, Post 2 The elite of the elite, the “super-gentry” of the Virginia colony defined themselves by their material possessions. Their crops, their slaves, their wives, their children, and their animals all served to visually display an ideal of class identity and power. Around themselves, the gentry created a built landscape of gardens, buildings, […]

Occupy Tidewater

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Eighteenth-century Virginia was a very different world than it was a century before: the colony that had struggled to exist, against all odds had become a thriving community.  The small, fortified settlements became cities, and the landscape became defined by sprawling farms and plantations.  As life for Virginians began to settle, so to did their […]

The Real Housewives of the Virginia Gentry

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

As Virginia continued to grow certain families began to grow in wealth and political power. These families are known as the gentry of Virginia. The most powerful person within these families was the father or male patriarch. These men are often the ones that history is written about. But there are other stories that are […]

Slaves and Women in 1700s Virginia

| Saturday, July 26th, 2014

As the infant colony of Virginia aged, an extremely wealthy gentry class emerged. These landowning white men rapidly changed the physical landscape around them. The wealthiest planters cleared acres of land to plant soil-destroying tobacco, and erected large, extravagant mansions.  Along with this change came the formation of race and class distinctions in society, with […]

« Previous Page     Next Page »